What the f**k is biodiversity?

Listen to the National Environmental Treasure’s podcast, What the f*** is biodiversity to learn about the incredible world of biodiversity. Hosted by Ann Dale, she chats with a range of experts about how biodiversity provides for us in our day to day lives and what we can all do to protect it now.

EPISODE 10: Native bees with Dr Sheila Colla

In this episode of What the f*** is biodiversity, Ann and Sheila talk about the important work of native bees in Canada and why they’re so critical for the environment and our food systems. Sheila also debunks some pretty common misconceptions about them as many species are solitary and don’t actually produce honey. She also shares how we can help support these important pollinators.

EPISODE 1: Soil Biodiversity with Dr Valerie Behan-Pelletier

In this episode of What the f*** is biodiversity, Ann and Val talk about the incredibly biodiverse world of soil and how it connects to the ground above that we as humans inhabit. We rely so much on the work of many different arthropods, like soil mites, since these small creatures are an integral part of the soil food web. Wherever there is food or vegetation, there are soil mites. And without the vital work they do, the quality of our food would seriously decline.

EPISODE 2: Protected Areas with Jeremy Guth

In this episode of What the f*** is biodiversity, Ann and Jeremy talk about protected areas, which are a major solution for biodiversity loss. They also discuss wildlife cores and corridors, wild animal crossings like the overpass in Banff National Park, and a design competition he launched for beautifying these structures. He also paints a picture of the scale of protected areas in Canada and what this momentous target could look like. There are many quotable moments in this episode so make sure you listen until the end.

EPISODE 3: Food and Biodiversity with Dr Lenore Newman

In this episode of What the f*** is biodiversity, Ann and Lenore talk about the food we eat and how this impacts biodiversity. They discuss everything from the American Bison and the extinction of the passenger pigeon to our food supply chains, COVID-19, and the historic lunch that founded Canada. They also discuss the most sustainable diet, the merits of eating organic versus local, and how you can’t catch a virus from a plant. Lenore also sets the record straight about a very famous quote we are all familiar with, so make sure you listen to the end.

EPISODE 4: Urban biodiversity with Nina-Marie Lister

In this episode of What the f*** is biodiversity, Ann and Nina-Marie talk about urban biodiversity. You may think of biodiversity as existing only in far-away places, but a lot of nature actually exists within our cities. And there’s so many ways we can help it thrive, which in turn helps humans. From integrating nature-based solutions and green infrastructure into our municipal planning to providing access to green space in cities.

EPISODE 5: Connecting people to nature with Brittany Gawley

In this episode of What the f*** is biodiversity, Ann and Brittany talk all about A Night for Conservation, how to guide and empower people through experiential learning and how to help them form a deeper connection with nature. They also touch on sustainable fashion, provide some interesting insight on the charitable sector in Canada, and talk about what barriers people face when entering environmental activism and conservation.

EPISODE 6: Giraffes with Anne Innis Dagg and Mary Dagg

In this episode of What the f*** is biodiversity, Ann, Anne and Mary talk about the beautiful and gentle Giraffe along with Anne’s amazing experiences researching their behaviour in the wild. They also talk about the challenges she faced as a woman in academia, how her daughter Mary is currently working to help protect Giraffes, and their thoughts on the decline of global biodiversity.

EPISODE 7: Can beauty and aesthetics help save biodiversity? with Dr. Hilary Leighton

In this episode of What the f*** is biodiversity, Prof. Ann Dale and Dr. Hilary Leighton have a wide-ranging conversation about whether the beauty and aesthetics of nature can help halt and reverse biodiversity loss. From ecopsychology and Aristotle to place bonding and reciprocity with nature, we catch a glimpse of their creative process as they brainstorm ideas for a new journal article.

EPISODE 8: The environmental sector with Bob Peart

In this episode of What the f*** is biodiversity, Ann and Bob talk about the environmental sector in Canada. They also discuss some of the amazing conservation initiatives taking place across the country and how he stays hopeful in the face of so much doom and gloom.

EPISODE 9: Native Bees with Dr Sheila Colla

In this episode of What the f*** is biodiversity, Ann and Sheila talk about the important work of native bees in Canada and why they’re so critical for the environment and our food systems. Sheila also debunks some pretty common misconceptions about them as many species are solitary and don’t actually produce honey. She also shares how we can help support these important pollinators.

The NET

The National Environmental Treasure (NET) is a people’s trust fund devoted to the exclusive funding of Canadian environmental organizations, to increase their core capacity in critical areas such as environmental literacy, infrastructure support, public communications, and operational sustainability. We are particularly interested in supporting under-funded smaller and medium-sized organizations, working in local communities and regions. Our goal is to build a $30 million-dollar public charitable foundation for the environment — the equivalent of every Canadian donating a “loonie” for their environment.

National Biodiversity Campaign: Our national campaign is working to raise awareness of biodiversity loss, the need for increasing protected areas in Canada and solutions for this unprecedented issue. If we live in harmony with biodiversity and work with nature’s systems, species will thrive, including humans. Canada is close to achieving our 2020 Biodiversity Goals and Targets, in which 17% of terrestrial areas and inland waters (almost achieved) and 10% of coastal and marine areas (already achieved) are protected. But we can do better. Let’s protect 30% by 2030, or even 50%.